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Thread: Psychedelic revival?

  1. #1
    Forum Member Sérgio's Avatar
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    Psychedelic revival?

    Inspired by the prog rock thread: do you guys like trippy psychedelic music?

    I do, and it doesn't necessarily have to be heavy, or even rock, so to speak. I like it when bands overdo a little with some wet reverb, phasers and leslie speaker emulators.

    Tame Impala is an obvious reference, and I like their stuff, though I didn't quite dig the last album.



    There's also these folks from the city where my own band is based:


  2. #2
    Forum Member Sérgio's Avatar
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    Re: Psychedelic revival?

    I think I've mentioned these guys here before, they're from California but one of the members is Brazilian, IIRC


  3. #3
    Forum Member OldStrummer's Avatar
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    Re: Psychedelic revival?

    "Psychedelic," like "prog rock" in the earlier thread, has been redefined a number of times, so I'm not sure exactly what it means anymore. In the 1960s, psychedelic was aimed at the LSD consuming, pot-smoking crowd, where long, extended jams and meandering threads put the listener into drug-induced trance states. If you watch concert videos recorded at the Fillmore Auditorium and the Avalon Ballroom for example, the light show was as much -- if not more sometimes -- than the music. Eric Clapton once remarked something to the effect that Cream would play for hours just repeating the same phrases and noodling because the crowd (and the band!) were too stoned to appreciate anything more.

    In the 1990s, the term "psychedelic" was adopted by the ambient/electronic crowd. Also based on drug-induced fevers, the terms "chill" and "downtempo" were taken up to help bring trippers off their psychedelic high. But the music wasn't a band using traditional (?) instruments, but almost entirely electronic, with synths, sequencers, pads and computers.

    I know it's popular to put labels on musical styles, but I'm lost these days. "Country" as it's played today I regard as "pop" music with cowboy hats and singers with a twang. R&B isn't what I used to know it then, such as in the Motown Sound, but is now a term applied to Rap. Huh?

    What I guess I'm trying to say is that I tend to eschew labels on music, because that sort of means painting performers into corners or boxes. And then I would likely find myself avoiding artists simply because in my mind I don't like the kind of music they're producing based on the label. "Hey, I don't like jazz, and so-and-so plays jazz, so there's no point in me listening to them." I don't want to fall into that rut.
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